You are here

Action against AMR

A practical initiative to combat antimicrobial resistance in developing countries and emerging markets by senior experts

Why

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an urgent and fast growing threat to human health worldwide. This resistance is caused by overuse of antibiotics in – not only - healthcare, but also in agriculture and livestock. More than half a million people die each year of infections by drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial resistance is caused by inappropriate use of antibiotics in healthcare, livestock and agriculture. Spread of resistant pathogens is facilitated by insufficient infection control practices and by environmental contamination of food, water and soil. This problem can be reversed by a well known set of multisectoral measures, referred to as “One Health”. However, implementation of these measures is lagging behind, especially in Low and Middle Income Countries (L&MICs). The Netherlands is renowned for its restricted antimicrobial consumption, leading to the lowest antibiotic use and resistance rates in the world, while retaining high health outcomes.
PUM and partners share 40 years of hands on, pro bono expertise and are keen to implement the “one health approach” at institutions and companies in L&MICs.

How

The causes of antimicrobial resistance in developing countries are complex and may be rooted in practices of livestock and agricultural value chains as to the healthcare sector’s behavior towards the use of antimicrobials as well as supply chains of antimicrobials in the
population. The implications are not only linked to healthcare, but impact other value chains (and eventually humans) too, like the food chain where AMR is a cross-sectoral issue. The problem of antimicrobial resistance can be reversed or slowed down by a set of measures, including:

  • Proper diagnostic strategies for infectious diseases and rational antibiotic use through stewardship programs and treatment guidelines
  • Government regulations concerning the availability and use of antimicrobials, for humans, livestock as well as agri-and horticulture
  • Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) – local production antibiotics
  • Waste water recycling (re-use etc.) at local producers antibiotics, livestock companies
  • and hospitals
  • Strict infection control measures in health care facilities

Senior medical specialists (clinical microbiologists, infectious disease consultants,pharmacists, infection control specialists and veterinarians), manufacturing practice specialist, waste water expert – retired or still active - are a suitable workforce to support capacity-strengthening activities on AMR in L&MIC settings.

What

Support healthcare providers, agri- and livestock companies (and beyond) on the essentials, control, prevention and techniques on dealing with AMR. Focus on the following themes:

Healthcare services

  • Implementing antimicrobial stewardship
  • Pharmacists and wholesalers who sell antibiotics
  • Healthcare institutions including private care those patients prescribe increasingly
  • heavier antibiotics)
  • Alternatives for antibiotic use in human healthcare, farming and livestock breeding
  • Strengthening infection control measures in health care facilities
  • Improving clinical microbiological diagnostics, including susceptibility testing

Environment

  • Implementing antimicrobial stewardship
  • Improving clinical microbiological diagnostics, including susceptibility testing
  • Strengthening infection control measures in health care facilities
  • Pharmacists and wholesalers who sell antibiotics
  • Healthcare institutions that prescribe increasingly heavier antibiotics to their patients
  • Alternatives for antibiotic use in human healthcare, farming and live-stock breeding

The initiative to combat antimicrobial resistance in developing countries and emerging markets - Action against AMR - is a joint effort of: